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May 20 2017 7 20 /05 /May /2017 12:15
Bunches of flowers knitting pattern

 

 

Bunches of flowers cushion cover knitted pattern

 

For a 16" cushion cover cast on 68 sts. With wrong side facing

Row 1. Seed st for 10 sts K1,P1. Cable P6. K5, P5. Bunch of flowers K7, P2, K7, P5, K5. CableP6. Seed st for 10 sts K1, P1

Row 2. Seed st for 10 sts P1, K1. Cable K6. P5, K5. Bunch of flowers P6, Cr2b (slip st onto cable needle and hold at back of work, K1 then P1 from cable needle), Cr2f (slip st onto cable needle and hold at front of work, P1 then K1 from cable needle), P6. K5, P5. Cable K6. Seed st for 10 sts P1, K1

Row 3. Seed st for 10 sts K1,P1. Cable P6. K5, P5. Bunch of flowers K5, Cr2f, P2, Cr2b, K5,P5, K5, Cable P6. Seed st for 10 sts K1, P1

Row 4. Seed st for 10 sts P1, K1. Cable K6. P5, K5. Bunch of flowers P4, Cr2b, Cr2b, Cr2f, Cr2f, P4. K5, P5. Cable K6. Seed st for 10 sts P1, K1

Row 5. Seed st for 10 sts K1, P1. Cable P6. K5, P5. Bunch of flowers K3, Cr2f, K1, P4, K1, Cr2b, K3. P5, K5. Cable P6. Seed st for 10 sts P1, K1

Row 6. Seed st for 10 sts P1, K1. Cable CB3 (slip 3 sts onto cable needle and hold at back of work, K3 then K3 sts on cable needle). P5, K5. Bunch of flowers P2, Cr2b, P1, Cr2b, K2, Cr2f, P1, Cr2f, P2. K5, P5. Cable CB3. Seed st for 10 sts P1, K1

Row 7. Seed st for 10 sts K1, P1. Cable P6. K5, P5. Bunch of flowers (K2, P1 x2), K1, P2, K1 (P1, K2 x2). P5, K5. Cable P6. seed st for 10 sts P1, K1

Row 8. Seed st for 10 sts P1, K1. Cable K6. P5, K5. Bunch of flowers P2, bb (make bobble K1, Yo, K1, Yo, K1 into same st, turn P5, turn K5, turn, P2tog, P1, P2 tog, turn, Slip 1, K2tog, psso). Cable K6. K5, P5. Seed st for 10 sts K1, P1

Row 9. Seed st for 10 sts K1, P1. Cable P6. K5, P5. Bunch of flowers K4, P1, K2, P2, K2, P1, K4. P5, K5. Cable P6. Seed st for 10 sts P1, K1.

Row 10. seed st for 10 sts P1, k1. Cable K6. P5, K5. Bunch of flowers P4, bb, P2, K2, P2, bb, P2. K5, P5. Cable K6. seed st for 10 sts K1, P1

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May 11 2017 5 11 /05 /May /2017 20:17
Diamond lattice cushion cover

Diamond lattice cushion cover

 

Diamond Lattice cushion cover 16"

Cast on 68 sts repeat sts in between brackets

Row 1. K3, (Cr2b (K 2nd st on left needle through back loop, K 1st st on left needle, pull both off needle), K4) continue until 5 sts are remaining Cr2b, K3

Row 2. Purl

Row 3. (K2, cr2f (K 2nd st on left needle through front loop, K 1st st on left needle, pull both off needle), Cr2b) K2

Row 4. Purl

Row 5. K1, (Cr2f, K2, Cr2b), K1

Row 6. Purl

Row 7. (Cr2f, K4) Cr2f

Row 8. Purl

Row 9. K1 (Cr2b, K2, Cr2f), K1

Row 10. Purl

Row 11. (K2, Cr2b, Cr2f), K2

Row 12. Purl

Continue until work measures 16 inches.

 

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April 20 2017 5 20 /04 /April /2017 13:30

Cast on 54 sts

Row 1. K6, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, k4, P4, K4, P6, K6

Row 2. P6, K6, P4, K4, P4, K6, P4, K4, P4, K6, P6

Row 3. K6, P6, k4, P4, K4, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K6

Row 4. P6, K6, P4, C2B (2 back) (K2, k2 from cable needle cn), P4, K6, P4, C2B, P4, K6, P6

Row 5. K6, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K6

Row 6. P6, C3F (3sts front) (K3, K3 cn), P4, K4, P4, C3F, P4, K4, P4, C3F, P6

Row 7. K6, P6, K4, P4, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K6

Row 8. P6, K6, P4, C2B, P4, K6, P4, C2B, P4, K6, P6

Row 9. K6, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K6

Row 10. P6, K6, P4, K4, P4, K6, P4, K4, P4, K6, P6

Row 11. K6, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K6

Row 12. P6, K6, P4, C2B, P4, K6, P4, C2B, P4, K6, P6

Row 13. K6, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, k6

Row 14. P6, K6, P4, K4, P4, K6, P4, K4, P4, K6, P6

Row 15. K6, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K6

Row 16. P6, CB3 (3sts back) (K3, K3 cn), P4, CP6, 2B, P4, CB3, P4, C2B, P4, C3B, P6

Row 17. K6, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K4

Row 18. P6, K6, P4, K4, P4, K6, P4, K4, P4, K6, P6

Row 19. K6, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K4, P4, K4, P6, K6

Row 20. P6, K6, P4, C2B, P4, K6, P4, C2B, P4, K6, P6

Repeat rows until desired length

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March 28 2017 3 28 /03 /March /2017 13:12
Cable cardigan

Cable cardigan

Easy knit cable cardigan

Pattern uses 3.25mm & 3.75mm needles, approx 3 100g balls of DK for a small adult (add additional sts in increments of 5 for larger sizes)

Back

With smaller needles cast on 103 sts. K1, P1, K1 (rib) to end. Continue until band measures 5cms. Increase 4 sts evenly across row (107 sts).

Change to larger needles.

Row 1. P1, K1, P3, K1, P1 continue pattern to end

Row 2. K2, slip st onto another needle and bring forward, knit 2 sts and slip unworked stitch back onto work, knit (cable created), K2 continue to end

Row 3. as row 1 to end

Row 4. Knit across the row. These 4 rows form the pattern throughout.

Continue in pattern until work measures 35.5cms.

Shape armholes. Cast off 7 sts at th ebegining of next 2 rows. Decrease 1 st at each end for the next 5 rows. Then alternate row 3 times. Continue even until armhole measures 19cms.

Shape shoulders. Cast off 9 sts at the begining of next 4 rows. Cast off remaining sts.

Left & right front

Knit both fronts on the same needle.

With smaller needles cast on 57 sts. K1, P1, K1 (rib) to end. Continue until band measures 5cms. Increase 3 sts evenly across row.

Change to larger needles. Work 9 sts in rib (making button holes where required) and then in pattern (as above) until fronts measure 35.5cms.

Shape armhole and V-neck. Cast off 7 sts at the begining of next row.

Keeping pattern work 2together at each end of next row

Next row pattern to last 2 sts, work 2together

Next row work 2together at each end of next row

Next row pattern to last 2 sts, work 2together.

Continue until work measures the same as back 27 sts

Shape shoulder. Cast off 9 sts at the begining of next row.

Rib extension. Continue to work remaining 9 sts of rib for 18cms (to be attached to the back of the neck later).

Sleeves

Make 2 on the same needle.

With smaller needles cast on 59 sts. Work 4 rows of rib (K1, P1). Increase 4 sts evenly across.

Change to larger needles and work pattern as above for 12 rows.

Increase 1 st at each end every 12 rows. Then every 14th row.

Continue in even pattern until work measures 44.5cms.

Shape top. Keeping pattern cast off 5 sts at the begining of the next 2 rows.

Decrease 1 st at each end on next and following alternate rows until there are 13 sts. Cast off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 27 2015 6 27 /03 /March /2015 08:55

westiebwallpaper.jpgWestie wallpaper                                                          

To  achieve this effect I used lining paper and drew the design with permanent fibre tip pens to prevent it from running as the glue was applied.

The design was inspired from the various poses my dog Poddington has and plants and flowers on our property during the season.

It only took a few months to complete, during the winter months. I am really pleased with the design and the fact my wallpaper is totally unique. 

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August 26 2014 3 26 /08 /August /2014 09:41

harvest mite

The harvest mites or chiggers are six-legged larva which are present on dense vegetation throughout the UK and are active during the day, especially when it is dry and sunny. When they come into contact with any warm blooded animal they insert their small hooked fangs into the surface layers of the skin, and inject a fluid to break down the cells in order to suck the animals blood. They appear as red dust on the animal like paprika on the face, legs, abdomen or any area where there is little fur.They will inject and suck for two to three days at the same site until it has increased in size three to four times causing considerable itching and discomfort to the animal. The larva then drops off, descends into the soil and after about six weeks becomes an eight-legged nymph and then an adult which eats plants and small insects. Eggs laid by the adult in the spring and summer hatch into the six-legged larva (known as harvest mites) and the cycle starts again.

In humans harvest mite bites show as small inflamed pimples and in cats the mites cause reddening of the skin, papules and crusted areas.

Walk  your dog early in the morning when the harvest mites are less active and keep him out of the long grass. Some infestations will cause hair loss and continual scratching can damage the skin resulting is bacterial infections.

 

Frontline or virbac Effipro spray prescribed by your veterinarian can be used weekly on areas seen in conjunction with routine flea treatment. Animals that are hypersensitive to Harvest mites can be prescribed a short course of steroid until the mites have reduced in number.link

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August 18 2014 2 18 /08 /August /2014 14:31

download.jpg

All chicken have mites, which is why they dust themselves but the warm weather multiplies them. These mites feed off the chickens blood supply, making your chickens anaemic and if left untreated die.  

 

The total kill ready to use solution containing pemethrin 0.23%, tetramthrin 0.023%, benzalkonium chloride even if sprayed directly onto the mites does not kill them. I have found that ant killer spray kills red mites and other crawling insects dead and stops them coming back.

 

I remove all bedding and shut the chicken out of the house while I spray and until the house is dry. During this summer months I have only had to do this twice.

 

 

I also dust my chickens every 6 weeks with total mite kill powder which contains diatomaceous earth, and use a mite recovery tonic in the water post any infestations. 

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August 2 2014 7 02 /08 /August /2014 10:33

elderberries.jpgThe flowers of the Elder tree can be used to make cordial but I prefer to wait until the tree has developed berries and they have turned black before I harvest to make jam. Forraged fruit gives a more complex flavour than that of usual berries. 

Picking the tiny berries off the tree and de-stalking the fruit takes time but it is worth the effort.

Fruit with minimal of no pips generally lack pectin so you need to use jam sugar or the pith of a lemon will work also to set the jam (it is the pith in fruit that contains pectin).

The normal recipe for jam making is equal quantities to fruit to sugar, so weigh the fruit and add to the pan and then add the same weight in jam sugar. 1-2 lemons should be sufficient to set the jam without making it too sharp.

Boil the jam until the temperature reaches 105c and continue for a further 10minutes, if you don’t have a jam thermometer when the jam coats the back of the spoon, or use the wrinkle test (where a spoonful of jam is placed on a place in the fridge to cool, push with a finger and if it wrinkles it is set).

 

Spoon off any scum from the jam and put into warm sterile pots, seal and store in a cool dry place. 

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October 18 2013 6 18 /10 /October /2013 12:08

Pod---the-vole-use.jpgThe dog became man’s best friend when it was discovered their use whilst out on a hunt. The spaniel (particularly the Springer) was ideal for running through the long grass acting as a ‘beater’, seeking out pheasants and the like.

The pointer was used to seek and point towards the prey. A well trained dog will have his nose inches away from the prey without touching it.

The retriever was used to retrieve the kill, bringing it back to the owner.

Both the pointer and retriever are known as ‘soft mouthed’, they are gentle, able to pick up the prey without leaving with bite marks. This is unlike the terrier (the ratter) whose vigorous shaking quickly dispatches most small animals.

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May 12 2013 1 12 /05 /May /2013 08:13

Duckling.jpg

Duck eggs have a gestation period of 28 days. As with chicken eggs it is a good idea to mark X and O turn on either side to ensure a full 180̊ turn, if hatching in an incubator.  Eggs should be turned 3 -5 times a day (ending up on opposite side than the previous side the night before). Eggs should be candled on day 10 due to longer gestation period than chickens. Look for clears, blood rings. Stop turning day 25 for lockdown and increase the humidity.

Once hatched require warmth from a brooder lamp and a quiet environment. Try not to handle the ducklings too much.

Put a drinking bowl inside the brooder. Use a very shallow bowl that enables the ducklings to dip in their beaks, but not their entire heads. Ducklings like to be able to clear their nostrils as they drink, but if you give them access to deeper water they might climb in and drown.

If you fear the bowl you have is a little too deep, line the bottom with pebbles or marbles to make it safer, or cover with wide chicken wire so that the ducklings can get their heads into the water but not their body. Change the water every day to make sure the ducklings don't get sick from drinking dirty water.

Ducklings don't eat for the first twenty-four hours after they hatch, since they're still absorbing nutrients from the yolk inside the egg they hatched from. After that, they graduate to starter crumbs, tiny pellets of duck food available at feed supply stores. Buy a plastic feeder, fill it up, and place it in the brooder. Add water to food to help them swallow it. Weak ducklings may need a little sugar in the water to give them energy.

Very weak or sick ducklings may need a little extra yolk nutrition before they're ready for starter crumbs. Feed them a bit of mashed duck egg yolk until they become more interested in the starter crumbs.

After about ten days, ducklings are ready for grower's pellets, which are the same as the starter crumbs, only bigger.

When the ducklings become adults, after about 16 weeks, they're ready for adult duck food and thinly cut fruits and vegetables as a snack.

Help the ducklings swim. Ducks love to swim, and they'll start as soon as the first day after they hatch if you let them. Do not let them swim unattended. Baby ducks are covered with down, which isn't waterproof, and their bodies are still too fragile to cope with swimming alone at this stage.

Make a little swimming pool out of a paint roller tray. The slope in the tray creates a little ramp to help the ducklings get in and out safely.

Don't let the ducklings swim too long, or they'll get chilled. When they're done swimming, dry them off gently and place them back in the brooder so they can warm up. Full feathers should be in place by 9-12 weeks of age.

Once the ducks are too big for the brooder, move them to a large pen. Feed them adult duck feed and let them spend their days swimming and splashing in a pond. Make sure to bring them back into their shelter at night to keep them safe from predators. Be aware that older adult ducks that may share the same pond or water source may try to drown or kill the younger ducks.  

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  • : Poddington and P
  • Poddington and P
  • : Poddington and P is about life in the country. It includes their creations, the animals they raise, and the plants and produce that they grow in the kitchen garden.
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